Waiting for spring

 early March cherry blossoms

early March cherry blossoms

This really is the hard part, isn't it? Teased by a week of mid-70 temperatures that initiated all sorts of blossoms (daffodils, azaleas, redbud, cherry, plum, magnolia, Bradford pear, forsythia and more), we now sit in a pool of stubborn gray, damp, cool weather. Some frosty night time temps already bit some of those early bloomers, lending an unwanted brown tone to the kaleidoscope of colors. 

The forecast shows a reason for optimism; real spring temps are of course inevitable. My flat of tomato seedlings are in that strange purgatory of "ready to transplant, but the time isn't right" - the night time temps are simply not yet accommodating. Today I will plant some more seeds because there simply seems to be no way to control myself! Area gardeners better get ready to host some really interesting works in progress.

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Most recent view of the babies

It certainly has been an interesting past few weeks, though, aside from seedlings, flowers and weather. I've had the good fortune of talking tomatoes, container and straw bale gardening to audiences at the Connecticut Flower and Garden show, Robeson County Master Gardeners in Lumberton NC, and a local county library. Next up - another library, then Chicago! Plans are being finalized for Virginia, Detroit and Wyoming. 

 My gathering audience at Lumberton NC

My gathering audience at Lumberton NC

I've also been a guest on The Grow Guide podcast  (episode 22) and, along with my daughter Sara, on the Burnt Toast podcast. Tomorrow at 3 PM EST I will be a guest on The Thomas Jefferson Hour, an NPR radio show. I feel so fortunate to have opportunities to share my adventures with tomatoes and gardening.

 One of our spirea in full bloom

One of our spirea in full bloom