Jul
24
6:30 PM18:30

Durham Gardener's Advice Fair - Free event - Sarah P Duke Gardens - I will provide a presentation on Container and Straw Bale Gardening

GARDENERS’ ADVICE FAIR

ASK THE EXPERTS July 24, 2018 6:30-8 pm & free for all

Area experts & garden suppliers answer your questions PRESENTATION Container & Straw Bale Gardening By Craig Lehoulier, NC Tomato Man

Exhibitors include:

• Briggs Avenue Community Garden

• Carolina Farm Stewardship

• Cure Nursery

• Durham County Ext. Master Gardener Volunteers

• Durham Garden Center

• I Must Garden

• Kiefer Nursery

• Multiflora Greenhouses

• New Soil Vermiculture

• Rain Gardens by the Soil & Water Cons. District

• Real Time Pain Relief

• Trees Durham

• Water Conservation & Efficiency Strategies

• Wild Birds Unlimited

Sponsored by the Durham Garden Forum in partnership with Durham County Extension Master Gardeners at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, 420 Anderson St., Durham

WORKSHOPS

Assessing Plant Health Decorating with Succulents & Air Plants

Plant Propagation

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Jul
12
6:30 PM18:30

Tomato and Wine Dinner, Acme Food and Beverage *** SOLD OUT*** but a dinner was added for Wed July 11

Restaurant website here . Watch for more info - this was just agreed, so much more to come soon.

From Kevin's newsletter

Info on the dinner from Kevin's newsletter

July 5, 2018
 

Greetings from Carrboro,

It wasn’t very far. A half-hour drive at most. Once into South Carolina, the roadside stands appeared one after the other. Peaches and fireworks. My mother was born in peach country - York County to be exact - and was deeply skeptical of any stand too close to a highway. She did not want to buy trucked-in Georgia peaches masquerading as local fruit. My singular focus was the fireworks. It was our pre-July 4th ritual.

We always ate outside on Independence Day. Hamburgers. Potato salad. Baked beans. Peach cobbler with Cool-Whip. Friends came over. It was the only time of year that my mother would buy the gallon jugs of fruit punch from the grocery store. Once it was dark, we'd light sparklers and bottle rockets first. Then, roman candles pushed into Coke bottles set in the middle of the yard. 

There was always a certain amount of hand-wringing hysteria around the roman candles. Primarily because one year a bottle fell over after the roman candle in it was lit. And the barrage of colorful flaming balls shot directly into our neighbor’s backyard and nearly lit their Pomeranian on fire. But every year the final pièce de résistance of our aerial display was always whatever outlandish Chinese miracle rocket I could goad my mother into buying. Everyone would gather around. And every year I envisioned such grandeur! Such majesty! And every year the sucker just whistled up into the sky only to explode with a loud and deeply uninspiring pop. Oh well. Such is life. 

At Acme, our summer ritual doesn’t involve any fiery fanfare of Chinese import. No sir. We rely instead on the grace and fortitude of our local farmers. And the downright deliciousness of our summer bounty of tomatoes. The 17th Annual Acme Tomato Festival will kick off next Thursday, July 12th with a wine dinner featuring our good friend, Craig LeHoullier, the NC Tomato Man. He’s the person that discovered the famed Cherokee Purple tomato grown on farms and in backyards across America. His book, Epic Tomatoes, is pretty spectacular. If you’ve got gardening questions, he’s probably got the answers. 

The Acme Tomato Festival Wine Dinner. It’s five courses and five wines. Think of it as summertime, squared. Reservations are required by phone for the dinner (919 929 2263). We’ll get started @ 6:30. Price is $65 per person. Menu is below. A credit card number will be required to reserve your seat. We expect the dinner to sell out quickly as the number of seats is limited. It’s going to be a great night. And don’t worry, the only fireworks will involve your taste buds.

This weekend at Acme: The Acme BLT. Rosé all day. Grilled bone-in ribeyes. Pan-seared Atlantic haddock. The Acme tomato plate (yes, it’s back). Market melon salad. Eggs in paradise. Blueberry shortcake. Pecan-crusted fried chicken. Blackened Salmon. Chilled Cucumber soup with pickled shrimp. Overnight beef shortribs. Forever roasted pig. Classic wedge salad. Fried okra and shishito peppers. Blackberry ice cream. Grilled Caesar salad with pan-seared scallops. Watermelon sangria. Cheeseburgers. Clams Casino. Cherry pie à la mode. Shooting Point Oysters on the half-shell (halfy hour every thursday. half-shells for half price. ooh la la.)

Well, that’s all the news from Carrboro. The staff at Acme look forward to serving you soon.

Cheers,

The Staff at Acme
Reservations 919-929-2263 or online
 

The Acme Tomato Festival Wine Dinner

1st
oven dried Blush & yellow Roma tomatoes
Chapel Hill Creamery Pheta, Georgia olive oil, pickled shrimp
Cava Avinyo Rosado

2nd
Southern tomato pie
2017 Chateau Thivin Beaujolais Rosé

3rd
pan-seared yellowfin tuna
tomato chutney, coconut sticky rice
2016 Chehalem Winery Grüner Veltliner

4th
grilled beef tenderloin
smoked tomato jam, corn pudding
2015 COS Nero d'Avola "Nero di Lupo"

5th
heirloom tomato spice cake
basil & cream cheese icing
El Maestro Sierra Pedro Ximénez

View Event →
Jul
11
6:30 PM18:30

Tomato and Wine Dinner, Acme Food and Beverage

Just added - a second wine dinner!  I will be there to share tomato stories and information and will have my books for sale.  Please contact the restaurant for info and to book.

Info on the dinner from Kevin's newsletter

July 5, 2018
 

Greetings from Carrboro,

It wasn’t very far. A half-hour drive at most. Once into South Carolina, the roadside stands appeared one after the other. Peaches and fireworks. My mother was born in peach country - York County to be exact - and was deeply skeptical of any stand too close to a highway. She did not want to buy trucked-in Georgia peaches masquerading as local fruit. My singular focus was the fireworks. It was our pre-July 4th ritual.

We always ate outside on Independence Day. Hamburgers. Potato salad. Baked beans. Peach cobbler with Cool-Whip. Friends came over. It was the only time of year that my mother would buy the gallon jugs of fruit punch from the grocery store. Once it was dark, we'd light sparklers and bottle rockets first. Then, roman candles pushed into Coke bottles set in the middle of the yard. 

There was always a certain amount of hand-wringing hysteria around the roman candles. Primarily because one year a bottle fell over after the roman candle in it was lit. And the barrage of colorful flaming balls shot directly into our neighbor’s backyard and nearly lit their Pomeranian on fire. But every year the final pièce de résistance of our aerial display was always whatever outlandish Chinese miracle rocket I could goad my mother into buying. Everyone would gather around. And every year I envisioned such grandeur! Such majesty! And every year the sucker just whistled up into the sky only to explode with a loud and deeply uninspiring pop. Oh well. Such is life. 

At Acme, our summer ritual doesn’t involve any fiery fanfare of Chinese import. No sir. We rely instead on the grace and fortitude of our local farmers. And the downright deliciousness of our summer bounty of tomatoes. The 17th Annual Acme Tomato Festival will kick off next Thursday, July 12th with a wine dinner featuring our good friend, Craig LeHoullier, the NC Tomato Man. He’s the person that discovered the famed Cherokee Purple tomato grown on farms and in backyards across America. His book, Epic Tomatoes, is pretty spectacular. If you’ve got gardening questions, he’s probably got the answers. 

The Acme Tomato Festival Wine Dinner. It’s five courses and five wines. Think of it as summertime, squared. Reservations are required by phone for the dinner (919 929 2263). We’ll get started @ 6:30. Price is $65 per person. Menu is below. A credit card number will be required to reserve your seat. We expect the dinner to sell out quickly as the number of seats is limited. It’s going to be a great night. And don’t worry, the only fireworks will involve your taste buds.

This weekend at Acme: The Acme BLT. Rosé all day. Grilled bone-in ribeyes. Pan-seared Atlantic haddock. The Acme tomato plate (yes, it’s back). Market melon salad. Eggs in paradise. Blueberry shortcake. Pecan-crusted fried chicken. Blackened Salmon. Chilled Cucumber soup with pickled shrimp. Overnight beef shortribs. Forever roasted pig. Classic wedge salad. Fried okra and shishito peppers. Blackberry ice cream. Grilled Caesar salad with pan-seared scallops. Watermelon sangria. Cheeseburgers. Clams Casino. Cherry pie à la mode. Shooting Point Oysters on the half-shell (halfy hour every thursday. half-shells for half price. ooh la la.)

Well, that’s all the news from Carrboro. The staff at Acme look forward to serving you soon.

Cheers,

The Staff at Acme
Reservations 919-929-2263 or online
 

The Acme Tomato Festival Wine Dinner

1st
oven dried Blush & yellow Roma tomatoes
Chapel Hill Creamery Pheta, Georgia olive oil, pickled shrimp
Cava Avinyo Rosado

2nd
Southern tomato pie
2017 Chateau Thivin Beaujolais Rosé

3rd
pan-seared yellowfin tuna
tomato chutney, coconut sticky rice
2016 Chehalem Winery Grüner Veltliner

4th
grilled beef tenderloin
smoked tomato jam, corn pudding
2015 COS Nero d'Avola "Nero di Lupo"

5th
heirloom tomato spice cake
basil & cream cheese icing
El Maestro Sierra Pedro Ximénez

View Event →
Mar
28
7:00 PM19:00

Gardening Workshop - North Regional Library - How to Grow Epic Tomatoes - Varieties, stories, and useful tips

Come with your questions and learn all about tomatoes - history, stories, varieties, and cultural tips for success....there will be informational handouts and packets of seeds for you, as well as an opportunity to purchase my books, Epic Tomatoes (20.00), and Growing Vegetables in Straw Bales (10.00) (both Storey publishing) - cash, credit or check fine.

View Event →
Mar
27
7:00 PM19:00

Gardening workshop - Southeast Regional Library - How to Grow Epic Tomatoes - Varieties, stories, and useful tips

Come with your questions and learn all about tomatoes - history, stories, varieties, and cultural tips for success....there will be informational handouts and packets of seeds for you, as well as an opportunity to purchase my books, Epic Tomatoes (20.00), and Growing Vegetables in Straw Bales (10.00) (both Storey publishing) - cash, credit or check fine.

View Event →
Mar
15
7:00 PM19:00

Gardening workshop - Northeast Regional Library - Bringing Your Garden to the Sun-success with containers and straw bales

Come with your questions and learn all about how a few hours a day can mean growing great veggies, flowers and herbs in a variety of ways...there will be informational handouts and packets of seeds for you, as well as an opportunity to purchase my books, Epic Tomatoes (20.00), and Growing Vegetables in Straw Bales (10.00) (both Storey publishing) - cash, credit or check fine.

View Event →
Mar
6
7:00 PM19:00

Garden workshop - Cameron Village Library - Bringing Your Garden to the Sun-success with containers and straw bales

Come with your questions and learn all about how a few hours a day can mean growing great veggies, flowers and herbs in a variety of ways...there will be informational handouts and packets of seeds for you, as well as an opportunity to purchase my books, Epic Tomatoes (20.00), and Growing Vegetables in Straw Bales (10.00) (both Storey publishing) - cash, credit or check fine.

View Event →
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Workshop - How to Grow Epic Tomatoes in YOUR gardens - Cameron Village Library

It may be surprising to learn that our love affair with this most essential summer vegetable (...botanically, a fruit) began in the mid 1800s. Filled with colorful pictures, Craig (who was fortunate to name the Cherokee Purple tomato in 1990) will take you through a bit of history, stories behind some of his favorite varieties, and the most important gardening tips to help everyone grow truly epic tomatoes in their own gardens. Be sure to bring all of your gardening questions.

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Oct
19
7:00 PM19:00

Workshop - Bringing Your Garden to the Sun, Eva Perry Library

Few of us have idea areas in our yard for a garden, but most of us have a nice sunny spot. Containers or straw bales are the perfect way to ensure that each of us will know what it is like to taste a freshly harvested tomato. Filled with colorful pictures, Craig's workshop will lead everyone through the key success factors of bringing your gardens to where the sun shines best in your yards. Be sure to bring all of your gardening questions.

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Oct
5
7:00 PM19:00

Workshop - How to Grow Epic Tomatoes in YOUR Gardens, Northeast Regional Library

It may be surprising to learn that our love affair with this most essential summer vegetable (...botanically, a fruit) began in the mid 1800s. Filled with colorful pictures, Craig (who was fortunate to name the Cherokee Purple tomato in 1990) will take you through a bit of history, stories behind some of his favorite varieties, and the most important gardening tips to help everyone grow truly epic tomatoes in their own gardens. Be sure to bring all of your gardening questions.

Everyone will leave with a packet of tomato seeds.  Craig will be selling copies of his books, Epic Tomatoes and Growing Vegetables in Strawbales (cash, credit, check OK). 

View Event →